PRE-CONFERENCE SHORT COURSES* | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 | 2:00 - 5:00 PM

SC1: Introduction to GPCR-Based Drug Discovery

This course will provide an understanding for some of the pharmacological complexities of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as for the tools used to study them in a drug discovery setting. The course is well suited for biologists, pharmacologists and medicinal chemists who have recently started working with GPCRs or for those who need a refresher on the latest technological advances and newest paradigms.

Instructor: Annette Gilchrist, PhD, Professor, Pharmacology, Midwestern University


Detailed Agenda

PRE-CONFERENCE DINNER SHORT COURSES* | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 | 6:00 - 8:30 PM

SC12: CLINICALLY RELEVANT ANIMAL MODELING FOR THE EVALUATION OF NOVEL ANTIBACTERIAL APPROACHES

The course will present a progression from small animal models (Galleria, mice) to more elaborate biofilm models (mice, rats, rabbits), and conclude with larger complicated models that include trauma reflective of where these infections cause hardware and implant problems (rats, pigs, goats). Each instructor will present typical evaluations of antibacterial products, both successes and failures. Each instructor will present examples of traditional small molecule antibiotic successes/controls and compare them to alternative antibacterial treatments such as vaccines, bacteriophage, etc. Important considerations for model development will be addressed such as: strain selection, biofilm, method of delivery, dosing, PK/PD considerations.

Instructors: Daniel V. Zurawski, PhD, Scientist/Principal Investigator, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

Joseph C. Wenke, PhD, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research

Kamilia Abdelraouf, PhD, Associate Director, Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development, Hartford Hospital

Detailed Agenda

DINNER SHORT COURSES* | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 | 7:00 - 9:30 PM

SC17: Technologies to Assess Permeability and Efflux in Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

Our lack of understanding of the molecular basis for compound penetration into and efflux out of gram-negative bacteria has been identified as a key bottleneck for the rational discovery of novel antibacterial compounds. A main driver of this knowledge gap is the historical lack of assays, tools, and/or predictive models to provide medicinal chemists with structure-activity relationships that could guide optimization of whole cell penetration (and efflux avoidance). However, there have been some recent, promising advances in the field which set the stage for future innovative approaches.

Instructors: David Six, PhD, Investigator III, Infectious Diseases, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research

Ram Iyer, PhD, Principal Scientist (Bacteriology), Entasis Therapeutics, Inc.


Detailed Agenda


See the rest of the short courses here: DiscoveryOnTarget.com/Short-Courses



* Separate registration required